Comic book reviews: Grindhouse #5-8

Time for more insanely twisted fun as I take a look at the second half of Alex De Campi’s horror anthology miniseries Grindhouse: Doors Open At MidnightYou can read my review of the first four issues here.  The two tales comprising Grindhouse #s 5-8 are “Bride of Blood,” illustrated by Federica Manfredi, and “Flesh Feast of the Devil Doll,” drawn by Gary Erskine.

When Alex De Campi was at Midtown Comics last October signing copies of Grindhouse #1, she commented that the third story arc, “Bride of Blood” would be “a medieval rape-revenge story.”  The movie that immediately leaped into my head is Meir Zarchi’s 1978 film I Spit On Your Grave, also known as Day of the Woman.  I’ve heard I Spit On Your Grave described as misogynistic, but I really do not think that is the case.  Yes, the movie’s heroine Jennifer, played by Camille Keaton, is brutally gang-raped by a group of men, but Zarchi films it in such a genuinely revolting manner that there is no way in hell that he intended for it to be sexy or erotic. In the final third of the story, once Jennifer recuperates and begins wrecking bloody retribution on the men who brutalized her, one of them does claim she was “asking for it” by dressing provocatively.  But this is obviously supposed to be the self-serving justification of a sexist pig, and soon after Jennifer enacts a particularly well-deserved & horrific revenge upon him.

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“Bride of Blood” is the story of Branwyn, a young woman from the House of Creagh Mawr who is to wed the Lord of Callyreath in an arranged marriage of political & financial convenience.  Branwyn is understandably nervous about marrying an older man who she barely knows, but her mother assures her that everything will be okay.  However, soon after the ceremony begins a horde of Reavers descends, slaughtering the wedding guests.  Branwyn’s mother is stabbed, and Branwyn herself sexually assaulted, mutilated and left for death.

Sometime later, Branwyn awakens at a nearby convent and learns that she is believed to be the last surviving member of the House of Creagh Mawr.  After the funeral of her beloved brother Corrin, the traumatized Branwyn steals his armor and sets out to avenge herself on the Reavers and their allies utilizing guerilla warfare.  The second chapter of “Bride of Blood” has De Campi offering up two shock plot twists in rapid succession, closing out the story in a dramatic finale of poetic justice.

The artwork by Federica Manfredi is exquisitely detailed.  De Campi explained that one of the reasons why she wanted to work with Manfredi, a female artist, is that given the story’s content she did not want the sexual violence to come across as glamorized, even if unintentionally.  Indeed Manfredi truly brings home the sick brutality of the villains’ actions.  I was actually cringing when I read the first chapter.  It really is stomach-churning stuff.  And it is so amazing that Manfredi starts out drawing “Bride of Blood” with this beautiful, dream-like fairy tale atmosphere, and then she rapidly shifts to depicting gruesome violence.  Likewise, in the second chapter Manfredi illustrates a lovely, idyllic winter landscape as the setting for Branwyn’s violent, blood-spattered vengeance.  The coloring by Dorotea Gizzi, Andrea Priorini, Diego Farina and Manfredi herself certainly drives home the shocking dramatic contrasts.

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De Campi’s final two part tale, “Flesh Feast of the Devil Doll,” is set in Oneida (that’s in Upstate New York, for all you provincial types).  In a prologue set in 1725, we see a sect of devil-worshipping European colonists in an underground chamber attempting to summon the demonic Azaroth via a willing virgin disciple.  Fortunately they are interrupted by the local Native American tribe who chuck a couple of barrels of gunpowder at the ceremony, blowing up the Satanists and sealing the cavern.

Flash forward to the present day, and the dark forces invoked centuries before have finally broken out due to a mining company engaging in fracking (see, the environmentalists were right, fracking is bad for the planet).  The long-ago virgin sacrifice emerges, her body now inhabited by a monstrous being.  She has a really nifty but gross trick, where she can twist her neck around 180 degrees and whip back her hair to reveal a gaping mouth full of spiraling razor-sharp teeth.  This “Devil Doll” begins stalking the countryside, looking for a new virgin sacrifice, in the process slaughtering numerous innocents, turning them into her undead servants.

Close by, the teenage girls of Oneida Field Hockey Camp are welcoming a new recruit.  Renae is a shy girl who really has no interest in sports, and is only there at her parents’ behest.  When the other gals engage in a bit of minor hazing, Renae runs to the bathroom to hide.  Tina, who projects an image of toughness & confidence, but underneath is a pretty decent person, goes to Renae and offers her some advice: “If you run away and cry every time you’re bullied, you will never ever stop being bullied…. Even if you feel like crying inside, pretend to be strong. Because here’s the thing: we’re all pretending. All the time.”

That night the girls, including Renae, head out via moped, looking for a place to hang out (De Campi stated in an interview that one of the reasons she asked Gary Erskine to illustrate “Flesh Feast of the Devil Doll” is because he knows how to draw mopeds).  Unfortunately it’s a very rural area, and the only place open late is Wal-Mart.  Some teenage boys also swing by the shopping center parking lot on their bicycles.  The two groups start some cheesy flirting, but before anything can really happen, they are quite rudely interrupted by the Devil Doll and her enthralled disciples, still searching for a virginal victim.  De Campi and Erskine give us some bloody devils & zombies vs. hockey sticks & guns action, as the teenagers fight off the hordes of Hell.  We even get the best laugh-out-loud use of a Phil Collins song since “In the Air Tonight” in the 2002 comedy The New Guy.

De Campi continues the theme that she worked through in her first four issues, of outsiders and marginalized individuals stepping up to the plate to become the true heroes.  During the time period that “Bride of Blood” is set, women are in a socially subservient role, with men assuming positions of power & influence.  But it falls to Branwyn to take the initiative and avenge the atrocities inflicted upon her family.  “Flesh Feast of the Devil Doll” shows the girls rescuing the guy, with quiet & introverted Renae finding the strength within her to help her new friends.

As with the first four issues of Grindhouse: Doors Open At Midnight, Francesco Francavilla and Dan Panosian provide alternating cover artwork.  The one that really stood out for me this time was Panosian’s stunning, atmospheric illustration for the cover to Grindhouse #6.  It is definitely tied with Francavilla’s cover from #3 for my favorite cover artwork from this miniseries.

Grindhouse 6 cover

Inside front cover artwork for all eight issues is courtesy of Marc Laming.  Assembled together, they form a very twisted but cool exploitation image.  I was searching about the Internet for a picture of the entire piece, but unfortunately I couldn’t find one.  But definitely check out Laming’s website for plenty of other cool art.

Apparently Grindhouse sold pretty well, and so De Campi is pitching a “season two.”  Hopefully Dark Horse will give her the green light.  The book is such a fun and twisted homage to exploitation B-movies.  At the same time, De Campi does superb work at genuine character development within her tales, along with genuinely witty, intelligent dialogue.  The result is a very nice blending of subtle character moments, irreverent humor, and over-the-top sex & violence.

Comic book reviews: Grindhouse #1-4

I was born a decade or so too late to have been the target audience for grindhouse movies, the kind of sleazy exploitation genre films to have played in second-rate cinemas back in the 1970s and early 80s.  By the time I was old enough to explore New York City on my own, most of those less-than-venerable institutions had closed their doors.  However, I caught quite a number of their successors via direct-to-video and cable TV releases.  And in the last decade, there’s been a surge in nostalgic interest in those old cheese-fests, at least partly brought on by the works of Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez.

Already being something of a B-movie aficionado, I’ve seen a handful of those “classic” grindhouse flicks on DVD.  Most of them fall into the so-bad-they’re-good territory.  They’re campy and violent and quite often sexist.  But at the same time, it’s interesting to see what those filmmakers working on a shoestring budget could accomplish with imagination & ingenuity in those long-ago days before anyone with access to a laptop could easily whip up some CGI effects.

So naturally my interest was piqued when the eight issue Grindhouse: Doors Open At Midnight series was announced by Dark Horse Comics.  Written by Alex De Campi, the series is comprised of a quartet of two-part tales, each an homage to the exploitation films of days past.  In the first four issues, we have a pair of over-the-top romps into sex, violence, sci-fi and horror entitled “Bee Vixens From Mars” and “Prison Ship Antares.”

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“Bee Vixens From Mars” sees the women of a small Southern town taken over by an alien insect queen, transforming them into horny, bloodthirsty femme fatales linked to a hive mind.  With nearly everyone in the town either mutated or brutally slaughtered, it falls to Deputy Garcia and the owners of the local convenience store, Wayne & Sergei, to battle the alien infestation.

I really think that Alex De Campi’s background as a woman who has lived & worked on three continents allows her to write from a different perspective.  In interviews, she has commented that one of the more interesting qualities of grindhouse fare was that often the protagonists were women and/or minorities.  Yeah, a lot of those movies were “sexploitation” or “blaxploitation” or whatever you want to call them, meaning the main characters were probably on the stereotypical or one-dimensional side.  But it nevertheless did provide some sort of avenue for depicting heroes who weren’t white males.  In contrast, as De Campi points out, the majority of big studio action & genre pictures nowadays usually feature handsome, macho, WASPy men as the main characters.

In contrast, in “Bee Vixens From Mars,” we have Deputy Garcia, an older Hispanic woman with white hair and an eye patch, as the ass-kicking savoir of humanity.  Backing her up are Wayne & Sergei, a gay couple originally from Eastern Europe.  You have a small group of individuals who can be considered outsiders to the traditional, mainstream population as the heroes.

The art on “Bee Vixens From Mars” is by Chris Peterson.  I’m not familiar with him, but he does great work on this book.  Peterson really draws the hell out of the erotically charged, ultra-violent story.  His layouts & storytelling are extremely strong.

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“Prison Ship Antares” is basically a women-in-prison story in outer space.  A group of hardened female convicts are sent away from Earth to settle Alpha Centauri, accompanied by their warden Kalinka and her contingent of cloned guards.  Yeah, I know, it doesn’t really sound plausible, trying to colonize another planet with only women.  But that’s the situation De Campi sets up in order to tell her second zany tale.  I’ve seen far more nonsensical scenarios in actual B-movies, so whatever.

In any case, Kalinka turns out to be insane, a sadistic religious nut who believes she is the reincarnation of a samurai warrior.  She decides to “burn away the sinful parts” of her prisoners, gruesomely killing them with acid and fire.  The convicts, led by a gal by the name of Spanish Fly, realize that they had better seize control of the Antares, and quick, before they all end up dead or mutilated.

With a set-up like this, you might be concerned that the book would devolve into “lipstick lesbian” pornography.  But, aside from a couple of cheekily playful sequences, for the most part De Campi writes the inmates as realistic, well-rounded individuals, giving them a certain amount of personality & background.  There’s only so much development she can fit into a 48 page story, but on the whole these women come across as real people, rather than merely objects of titillation. They’re sexy, but intelligent and tough.

Simon Fraser is the artist on “Prison Ship Antares,” and I could not have thought of a better choice to illustrate this tale.  Fraser is the co-creator, with writer Robbie Morrison, of the Nikolai Dante feature in 2000 AD.  Dante was, in his early tales, sort of a ne’er-do-well rogue, a hedonistic adventurer who got involved in all sorts of wacky sexcapades.  The first couple of Dante stories I ever read were “The Movable Feast” and “The Cadre Infernal,” which were set in, respectively, a gigantic brothel on wheels and a BDSM club.  So, yeah, Fraser knows how to draw smut… and I mean that in the nicest way possible.  No, but seriously, Simon is a fantastic artist.  He really imbues his characters with a great deal of personality & individuality through facial expressions and diverse body types.

Truthfully, there is actually a lot more violence than sex in “Prison Ship Antares.”  Some of it is horrific.  Other parts are just plain hysterical, such as when the prisoners riot against the clone guards while singing the “Toreador Song” from Georges Bizet’s Carmen.  Frasier does a superb job with that sequence.

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There is another distinct quality to both of these tales.  Since each of them are stand-alone stories, sometimes it really seems up in the air whether or not various characters will live or die.  Without a status quo to adhere to, you half-expect De Campi to bump off one or more of her lead characters.  It really does keep the reader a lot more on edge.

The covers for the first four issues of Grindhouse: Doors Open At Midnight are by Francesco Francavilla and Dan Panosian.  Both of them have designed a couple of nice, striking pieces, sort of faux movie posters which also have a rather retro, pulp feel.

If you are a fan of genre films and B-movies, you’ll probably enjoy Grindhouse: Doors Open At Midnight.  It’s a fun, strange homage to exploitation films, with something of a tongue-in-cheek feminist slant given to the old genre formulas.  I’m looking forward to seeing what De Campi and her collaborators have in store for the next four issues.  It should be crazy.